Brushing your Teeth the Right Way

Brushing your Teeth the Right Way

The act of brushing your teeth is a relatively simple affair, or so we think right? Really, how can something we’ve done on our own since we were children be complicated?

However, if you ask the dentists, it seems most of us have been doing it the wrong way the whole time. There are many factors to consider when putting your teeth and gums through a good ol’ round of cleaning, these include the brushing technique (yes, there is such a thing), the type of tooth brush used and the length of time spent brushing your teeth.

Indeed, there’s a science to brushing your teeth, and if you want to avoid dental problems in the future, you’d do well to pay close attention.

How Long should you Brush?

This is the part of teeth brushing that most people make mistakes with. If you want to brush your teeth the right way, brush them for at least 2 minutes, nothing less. When was the last time you spent 2 minutes brushing your teeth? We’re going to hazard a guess that it’s rare for you to spend that much time doing such a mundane activity. In fact, most people don’t even make it through the 1 minute mark!

Teeth Brushing Technique

Proper brushing technique is important as well. You’ve probably heard that it’s best to brush using circular motions using gentle, compact strokes. It’s a common practice to brush harder in order to get all that plaque and gunk out of your teeth, but doing so is actually counterproductive as it just wears down your enamel—plus you’ll only end up hurting your gums with all your exuberance.

Make sure you go through both the inside and outside areas of your teeth. Don’t forget to brush your gums as well—be extra gentle when doing so. And finally, give your tongue a good brushing as well.

The next important aspect of brushing your teeth properly is brushing technique. You should brush using small, gentle circular motions. You should also make sure to brush all areas of your mouth including the inside and outside surfaces of the teeth, your gums, and your tongue as well. Refraining from opening your mouth fully, as this can make it harder to get to the lower sides of the teeth and gums.

 When to Brush

Brush twice a day, once after you wake up, and once more before you retire for bed. Try not to drink or eat anything after you brush during the evening.

The Type of Toothbrush

The right toothbrush for your needs will help as well. While the hardness of the bristles in a toothbrush is a matter of preference, many dentists recommend using one with soft bristles with a small head, the better to get into those hard to reach areas.